Wednesday Morning Workshops
September 21
, 2022

Click Here to Register for Workshops

Workshop W01:

9a - 12p

PLAY-SAY: Beyond Pairing- Improve Assent, Social Engagement and Verbal Behavior Via Social Play Chains

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA

TAMARA KASPER (Caravel Autism Health, [email protected])

 

PLAY-SAY: Beyond Pairing- Improve Assent, Social Engagement and Verbal Behavior Via Social Play Chains Increased emphasis on client assent refocuses the importance of naturalistic developmental behavioral intervention (NDBI) to improve the value of social stimuli and shape indicating responses. Defining and measuring indicating responses (e.g., eye gaze, approach, gesture, vocalization) to identify ”likes” (declarations of establishing operations), “dislikes” (declarations of abative operations) and withdrawal of assent provides opportunities to honor The Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts and shape agency in children with autism. Indicating responses provide opportunities to teach functional and formal communication to make choices, indicate assent, and calmly and clearly indicate assent withdrawal. Improving the frequency and variety of Indicating responses is also correlated with improved language outcomes (Topping, et al. 2013), learner cooperation (Shillingsburg, Bowen & Shapiro, 2014; Shillingsburg, Hansen & Wright, 2019), and has been correlated with social behavioral cusps and better learner outcomes (Harms & Greer, 2020). Instruction can be challenging when confronted with individuals with limited attending to others and restricted reinforcer pools. A view of early social, play, and communicative milestones through developmental and behavioral lenses allows the operationalization of methods to create play chains via four different categories of play. Pausing or adding novelty to the play chains provides opportunities to reinforce and shape early non-verbal communication, promote attending and responding to instructor social stimuli, condition ongoing social interaction as a reinforcer, and shape verbal behavior. This workshop, informed by the literature from speech-language pathology and applied behavior analysis, will provide methods to topographically define and measure indicating responses through three initial phases of intervention. Participants will learn to create social behavioral play chains that can be used to increase rate, variety, and sequences of indicating responses. Methods to reframe and refocus the use of toys/activities in novel ways to inspire staff and improve cooperation and rate of learning in clients will be presented via video and modeling. Special emphasis will be placed on improving and expanding variety of reinforcers in children with limited or atypical Motivating Operations. Data will be used as a guide to increase response effort and shape verbal vocal behavior. Participants will leave with a set of clear procedures and manualized information to systematically train staff to create/contrive highly motivating play chains that can serve as a foundation for development of social skills and can be used to address learner specific goals and targets across the verbal operants. Presented via Direct Instruction, a self-instruction mnemonic and behavioral skills training, this workshop will prepare participants to use multiple exemplar play chain training to establish staff competency. Come prepared to analyze video, role play scenarios with toys/activities and practice coaching staff. Leave with multiple examples of social play chains and data collection methods to measure key performance indicators for clients and staff with examples from CentralReach. Learn to scale and sequence training for successful staff implementation and client improvement. Outcome data from a pilot project which demonstrates improvement in learning opportunities after training implementation will also be presented.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Identify, topographically define, and measure indicating responses.

 2.

Identify, topographically define, and measure indicating responses.

 3.

Identify appropriate targets for staff improvement in creating behavior chains in play.

 Bio of Presenter:

Tamara S. Kasper, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, is a pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist who has treated children with challenging behavior since 1990, specializing in children with autism since 1995. Tamara’s commitment to the children she serves led her to pursue treatment methods outside the field of Speech-Language Pathology. She has advanced training in Nancy Kaufman’s strategies for apraxia of speech and partnered with Nancy to create The K&K Sign to Talk Materials and App. She has advanced training in Applied Behavior Analysis/Applied Verbal Behavior, and under the mentorship of renowned Behavior Analyst Dr. Vincent Carbone and his protégé, became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Described by attendees as “inspirational” and “empowering,” Tamara is a frequently invited international lecturer, enthusiastically sharing intervention techniques that building functional verbal behavior, social communication skills and combine social skills training with physical training. She has lectured and treated individuals across the United States and Canada as well as in Ethiopia, Senegal, Greece, Germany, England, Ireland, and other countries. She is past recipient of WISHA’s Clinical Achievement Award. Tamara directed The Center for Autism Treatment near Milwaukee, Wisconsin for 15 years, and now serves as Director, Clinical Center of Excellence for Caravel Autism Health.

 
 

Workshop W02:

9a - 12p

Higher Level Clinical Leadership: Measures of Clinical Quality

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA, SUP
COLLEEN DEMELLO (Applied Behavioral Strategies, [email protected])
MELISSA OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies, [email protected])
AMANDA BLOOM (Cultivate Behavioral Health & Education, [email protected])
STEPHEN WOOD (Cultivate Behavioral Health & Education, [email protected])

 

This workshop will focus on the role of higher-level clinical leadership. Participants will learn strategies for managing oversight of clinical services in larger and/or growing organizations. Specifically, the workshop will focus on the role of a clinical manager and clinical director (Tarbox, 2020) and processes for supervising other BCBAs. This will include the structure and function of 1:1 meetings including the development of an agenda and measures of progress and goal attainment. The role of compliance audits will also be discussed including documenting 5% RBT supervision and completion of session note audits. Finally, the role of training will be discussed including the process for onboarding training and policies regarding on-going training. Extensive handouts will be provided and ample time for question and answer will be allowed.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Discuss important topics to be covered in BCBA supervision meetings.

 2.

Describe how to complete clinical audits for RBT 5% supervision and session note audits.

 3.

Develop key content for onboarding at their own business.

Bio of Presenter:

Colleen is a board certified behavior analyst and licensed professional counselor. She has over 25 years’ experience working in the field of applied behavior analysis in the areas of early intervention, adult and child mental health, family support, and foster care. She has served as a Consultant, Administrator, and Clinician within state and privately funded agencies, schools, and families homes.

Co-presenters’ bios available upon request.

 

Workshop W03:

9a-12p

ABA Billing: A BCBA's Guide to Billing and Coding

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA
MICHELLE CASTANOS (South Florida ABA, [email protected])
ASHLEY ADAMS (Spectrum ABA Billing, [email protected])

 

With all the recent changes in ABA coding, many BCBAs and providers are finding themselves scrambling to keep up with the changes. This presentation will be an intro to billing for ABA. Participants will get a better understand of the category one CPT codes, their definitions and how to use them. We will also be reviewing medical necessity criteria and basic requirements from most major providers in Florida. Lastly we will provide tips for managing denials from funding sources. The goal is for participants to leave with the basic skills necessary to understand ABA billing.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Discuss the history of autism and ABA and the landmark cases and laws that got us insurance coverage for ABA in Florida.

 2.

Identify and define the category one CPT codes, their clinical interpretation, definitions and how to ensure we are providing clinically appropriate services while following the guidelines.

 3.

List the requirements for commercial plans, Medicaid and other major funding sources in Florida. They will also state medical necessity criteria, how to access services and tips for dealing with denials form funders.

Bios of Presenters:

Michelle Castanos is a BCBA who has been in the field of ABA for over 15 years. She received a Bachelor in Psychology and a Master in Special Education from the University of North Florida. Her work in ABA was inspired by her cousin, Miguel, who was diagnosed with ASD in 1997. She started working as a tech in 2004, at the age of 18. By 2007, she opened a company providing behavioral-based babysitting for children with Autism. Today that company has evolved into a full pediatric ABA center in Miami, FL. She is one of the Founders of THRIVE, the first post-secondary college support program for students with ASD in Florida, located at the University of North Florida. She has also worked on mobile crisis teams and institutional settings for adults with ID/DD and dual diagnosis. Michelle is currently the vice president of SOFABA, the South Florida Chapter of COFABA. She is also the moderator for the Florida Medicaid ABA Facebook forum.

Bio for co-presenter available upon request.

 

Workshop W04:

9a-12p

Training on the use of a reinforcement-based treatment package to address Picky Eating

Skill Level: Introductory
3.0  CEU – BA, MH, PSY

ANIBAL GUTIERREZ (University of Miami, [email protected])

 

Selective eating or “picky eating” is often described as a reluctance to try new foods based on some dimension of the food. Children diagnosed with autism frequently exhibit these types of selective eating behaviors. Rigidity or adherence to sameness is a defining feature of autism that may extend to feeding and lead to habits that are difficult for parents to break. These feeding difficulties may cause significant parent stress and could potential lead to more severe mealtimes behaviors in the future. The treatment package presented has demonstrated success in increasing food acceptance without the use of escape extinction.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Describe the features of picky eating.

 2.

Describe the steps in the Picky Eating manual.

 3.

Administer the Picky Eating assessment tool.

Bios of Presenter:

Dr. Gutierrez is Research Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Miami and a board certified behavior analyst with experience in the assessment and treatment of severe problem behavior and in the development of adaptive skills for individuals with autism. Current research interests focus on the factors that influence treatment effectiveness in behavioral acquisition programs and the integration of technology in behavioral interventions.

 

 

Workshop W05:

9a - 12p

Defining and Incorporating Assent into Programming: A Nonlinear Constructional Analysis and Approach

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA, ETH, MH, PSY
AWAB ABDEL-JALIL (Eastern Florida Autism Center/Great Leaps Academy, [email protected])
RICHELE YEICH (Eastern Florida Autism Center/Great Leaps Academy, [email protected])

 

Assent is presently a popular topic among behavior analysts given its inclusion in the 2022 BACB Ethics Code, and the current political climate around Applied Behavior Analysis. The Code defines assent as “vocal or nonvocal verbal behavior that can be taken to indicate willingness to participate in research or behavioral services...” (p. 7). Although there has been plenty of discourse around assent, its meaning remains ambiguous. Can assent, or lack thereof, be defined procedurally in terms of contingency arrangements? This workshop will begin by defining assent though a Nonlinear Contingency Analytic lens. The provided conceptualization defines assent based on the presence or absence of certain contingency arrangements, which goes beyond the common topographical definitions. True assent will be distinguished from apparent assent utilizing a degrees of freedom analysis. Examples and non-examples will be provided to illustrate this distinction. Attendees will then identify examples and non-examples of vignettes based on situations commonly encountered by clinicians working with Autism Spectrum diagnosed learners. If assent is determined to be absent or withdrawn, how can a clinician/practitioner proceed while honoring the learner’s dissent? The Constructional Approach will be introduced as a way to create assent-informed programs by asking a few guiding questions related to desired outcomes, entry repertoires, maintaining consequences, and programming sequences. The answers will help clinicians create programs that build on learners' entry repertoires that lead to full participation in the program. Dr. T. V. Joe Layng will join via Zoom near the end of the workshop for follow-up, and to answer any further questions attendees may have. Attendees will leave the workshop with a clear nonlinear contingency analytic definition of assent, be able to determine whether true learner assent is present, and tips/strategies of how to create a constructional program that incorporates and honors learner assent.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

1.

Define assent functionally.

 2.

Identify examples and nonexamples of assent.

 3.

Assess for the presence or absence of assent and program for it.

Bios of Presenters:

Awab Abdel-Jalil, MS, is the Constructional Coach at Eastern Florida Autism Center and Great Leaps Academy. He's also a current PhD student at Endicott College under Dr. T. V. Joe Layng's mentorship. Awab began his study of behavior analysis as an undergraduate at the University of North Texas and carried his passion for the science into the graduate program. On the graduate level, he was introduced to the work of Dr. Israel Goldiamond in Dr. Jesús Rosales-Ruiz's Constructional Life Design lab. In lab, he participated in streamlining and carrying out constructional programs for first-generation college students and students from low-income families. Awab has presented on the constructional approach, nonlinear contingency analysis, and problem solving at the Association for Behavior Analysis International. He also conducted basic human operant research in graduate school on resurgence, contingency adduction, stimulus control, and schedules of reinforcement using the Portable Operant Research and Teaching Laboratory (PORTL). As the Constructional Coach at Eastern Florida Autism Center and Great Leaps Academy, he works with parents on programs based on the constructional approach and nonlinear contingency analysis. He also conducts meeting to teach the constructional approach, nonlinear contingency analysis, and PORTL to the staff. Awab recently coauthored the book Nonlinear Contingency Analysis: Going Beyond Cognition and Behavior in Clinical Practice.

Bio for co-presenter available upon request.

 

Wednesday Afternoon Workshops
September 21
, 2022

Please note the duration of each (3 versus 4 hours).

Workshop W06:

1p - 5p (4 hours)

Trauma: The Invisible Elephant Underlying Challenging Behavior (4 Hour Workshop)

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA, MH, PSY
JEANNIE GOLDEN (East Carolina University, [email protected])
PAULA FLANDERS (Rethink Ed, [email protected])
DANIELLE WEBB (East Carolina University, [email protected])
MELISSA GLENN (East Carolina University, [email protected])

 

Behavior analysts are often charged with the responsibility of dealing with challenging behaviors and may be unaware of the impact of underlying trauma on these behaviors. These challenging behaviors are frequently not amenable to traditional functional behavioral assessments (FBAs) and positive behavioral interventions (PBIs). This may be because behavior analysts are reluctant to incorporate distal setting events, discriminative stimuli, and motivating operations into their FBAs, which is essential to the incorporation of trauma into these analyses. Further, it is necessary to acknowledge the impact of verbal behavior in implementing effective interventions, as covert thoughts and feelings often are the establishing operations that motivate challenging behaviors. This workshop will familiarize participants with FBAs that incorporate trauma as well as with strategies that use verbal behavior in conducting interventions. They will see role-play demonstrations of these strategies and practice these strategies with feedback and correction. 

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Explain why youth who have experienced trauma are more likely to exhibit challenging behaviors.

 2.

Describe how to incorporate distal setting events, discriminative stimuli, and motivating operations into functional behavioral assessments of youth who have experienced trauma.

 3.

describe some of the verbal behavior strategies that could be effective interventions for youth who have experienced trauma.

Bio of Presenters:

Dr. Jeannie A. Golden is a Licensed Psychologist who received her Ph.D. in School Psychology from Florida State University in 1981. Dr. Golden has taught in the Psychology Department at East Carolina University for 40 years and became the first nationally Board Certified Behavior Analyst in North Carolina in 2000. Dr. Golden received ECU teaching awards in 2001 and 2009, the FABA Honorary Lifetime Membership Award in 1994, the NCABA Fred S. Keller Excellence in Behavior Analysis Award in 2005, the ECU Scholarship of Engagement Award in 2012, the NCABA Do Things Award for Outstanding and Sustained Contributions in 2013, the ECU Psychology Department Award for Distinguished Service in 2015, and the ECU Psychology Department Faculty Appreciation Award for Mentoring in 2017. Dr. Golden and colleagues received grants from Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust (2008-2011) and the Department of Health and Human Services (2011-2016) to provide school-based mental health services in two rural, impoverished counties in North Carolina. In March of 2018, Dr. Golden and colleagues were awarded the Creating New Economies Fund Grant by Resourceful Communities for the Greene County Community Advancement Project. Recently, Dr. Golden and colleagues have developed a training program for staff who work with traumatized youth.

Bios for co-presenter available upon request.

 

Workshop W07:

1p - 5p (4 Hours)

Use Your EARS To Change How Providers Work Together So That Every Client or Student Makes Efficient Progress (4 Hour Workshop)

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA, SUP, MH, PSY
GUY BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, [email protected])

 

Are you satisfied with the progress of your clients and students? This workshop will teach you how to design and implement an organizational performance engineering process, to change how providers work together so that every client and student makes efficient progress. Organizational Performance Engineering is an application of behavior analysis with the following steps: 1) Evaluate student progress, 2) Analyze provider performance problems, 3) Recommend changes in provider resources, training, and management, and 4) Solve provider performance problems by designing and implementing recommended solutions. The workshop will provide a workbook with practice exercises, 7 sets of practice cards, and free subscriptions to ProgressCharter, a software application that will facilitate design and implementation of the EARS process. 

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Evaluate student progress using frequent, accurate, sensitive measures of client or student progress.

 2.

Analyze provider performance problems including a) "Can-Do" problems due to inadequate resources, b) "Know-How problems due to inadequate training, and c) "Want-To" problems due to inadequate management.

 3.

Recommend changes in provider resources, training, and management based on the data-based analysis.

Bios of Presenter:

Since earning his Ed. D. in Educational Psychology from the Behavior Analysis in Human Resources program at West Virginia University, Dr. Bruce has taught behavior analysis in both undergraduate and graduate programs and consulted with variety of organizations. He is the author of Instructional Design Made Easy—a workbook for designing more efficient learning programs, and EARS, a pragmatic, organizational performance engineering process that can be used to improve how people work together so that every client or student makes efficient progress. EARS is an acronym for 1) Evaluate student progress; Analyze causes of teacher performance problems and the performance problems of those who provide resources, training, and management to support the teacher; Recommend changes in teacher and provider resources, training, and management; and Solve provider performance problems by designing and implementing recommended solutions. In addition to conducting EARS workshops, he is writing a second book, Engineering Schools for Student Success, and designing a web-mobile application, “Progress Charter‚” that will make it easier for schools to design and implement the EARS process.

 

Workshop W08:

1p - 5p (4 Hours)

Trauma Informed Treatment Plans (4 Hour Workshop)

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA, MH, PSY
SAUNDRA BISHOP (BASICS ABA Therapy, [email protected])

 

Behavior analysts focus on observable and measurable behavior and direct function. This can make it difficult when trauma informed strategies seem counter to our assessments. However, if BCBAs and other providers that create behavior plans look at trauma events as setting events, they can create sensitive and effective interventions, which support all clients, including those who may be in foster care, school programs, or even simply living through COVID-19. We will explore how to identify Trauma Events, interventions targeting Trauma Event Setting Events (TESE), interventions targeting teaching Trauma Informed Replacement Behaviors, and what programs can be used to teach these goals.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Implement a trauma informed antecedent intervention addressing trauma event setting events.

 2.

Identify Replacement behaviors addressing setting events, trauma event setting events, and function.

 3.

Discuss real programs that teach replacement behaviors and will be able to implement them.

Bios of Presenters:

Saundra is the founder, CEO, and Clinical Director of BASICS ABA Therapy. She is also President Elect of DC ABA. Saundra has 20 years of experience working in Applied Behavior Analysis and with people with Autism/Autistic people and has been a BCBA for 13 years. She is especially passionate about Trauma-Informed Behavior Management and models that focus on self-advocacy rather than compliance. She is a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional and also certified to give trainings that qualify for Type-2 CEUs, DCPS CEUs, and CFSA foster parent hours. Saundra was a foster parent for 7 years and has 4 children (3 who are adopted).

 

Workshop W09:

1p - 4p

Training on the use of the Motor and Vocal Imitation Assessment (MVIA)

Skill Level: Intermediate
 3.0  CEU – BA
ANIBAL GUTIERREZ (University of Miami, [email protected])
ELAINE ESPANOLA (University of Miami, [email protected])

 

The Motor and Vocal Imitation Assessment (MVIA) is an empirically validated hierarchy of imitation skills that serves as a protocol for selecting targets for imitation intervention. The MVIA provides a baseline level of imitation skills, a validated sequence of imitation skills and a method of tracking skill mastery. The MVIA contains a comprehensive compilation of features and characteristics that determine the level of complexity of imitation tasks. This compilation of features and characteristics is the product of previous research examining the development of imitation. Research suggests that use of the MVIA can result in better intervention outcomes for imitation skills. 
By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Describe the relationship between imitation and outcomes for individuals with ASD.

 2.

Describe the hierarchy of difficulty in imitation skills.

 3.

Administer the MVIA as an assessment tool.

Bio of Presenter:

Dr. Gutierrez is Research Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Miami and a board certified behavior analyst with experience in the assessment and treatment of severe problem behavior and in the development of adaptive skills for individuals with autism. Current research interests focus on the factors that influence treatment effectiveness in behavioral acquisition programs and the integration of technology in behavioral interventions. Bio for co-presenter available upon request.

 

Workshop W10:

1p - 4p

Beyond Knowledge and Skills: Preparing Ethical Practitioners through Effective Supervision

Skill Level: Intermediate
3.0  CEU – BA, SUP, ETH

TYRA SELLERS (TP Sellers, [email protected])

NATALIE BADGETT (University of North Florida, [email protected])

 

Supervisory relationships, whether in the context of supervised fieldwork or professional oversight, are complex and require skills and knowledge beyond technical behavior analysis. Board Certified Behavior Analysts® (BCBA®s) supervising Registered Behavior Technicians® (RBT®s) are required to facilitate the RBTs understanding and implementation of the RBT Ethics Code (2.0), as well as a general understanding and the Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts. This workshop will present evidence-based and best practices for supervision with an emphasis on ethical practice. Content will connect ethics codes for BCBAs and RBTs, identify some of the primary goals of supervision, present common issues faced in supervisory relationships and strategies to address these issues, and will provide attendees with opportunities to practice skills related to high quality supervision.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

 1.

Draw connections between ethical codes for RBTs and BCBAs to develop an understanding of ethics of each role.

 2.

Identify common barriers for effective supervision and strategies for preventing and addressing these barriers.

 3.

Demonstrate skills related to high quality supervision and leadership, including problem solving, interpersonal behavior, feedback delivery, and cultural humility.

Bio of Presenter:

Tyra P. Sellers is the owner of TP Sellers, LLC. She earned a B.A. in Philosophy and M.A. in Special Education from San Francisco State University, a J.D. from the University of San Francisco, a Ph.D. from Utah State University, and is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst®. Her professional and research interests focus on professional ethics, training and supervision, assessment and treatment of severe problem behavior, and variability. Dr. Sellers has over 20 years of clinical experience working with individuals with disabilities in a wide variety of settings. She has published several journal articles, two co-authored book chapters, and co-authored the book titled Building and Sustaining Meaningful and Effective Relationships As A Supervisor and Mentor. She currently serves on the editorial boards for several journals. Bio for co-presenter available upon request.

 

To register for a workshop, please click HERE.